Frances Slocum State Park

Rock shelter along the Frances Slocum Trail

Frances Slocum State Park covers over 1,000 acres and features an 165 acre lake popular with paddlers and anglers.  The park was named after a little girl kidnapped by Indians in 1778; it is believed she was initially kept captive in what is now the park.  Frances’ relatives never stopped looking for her, and eventually she was found in a reservation in Indiana.  Frances was given the name “Mocanaquah”.  She died in 1847 at the age of 74, in Indiana.  Indiana also has a state park named after her.

The park features over thirteen miles of trails that explore woodlands, small streams, the lake, and plantations of tamarack and pine.  Mountain biking is permitted and the western section of the park features many stone walls, some are so interconnected, they resemble a maze.

We visited the park on an overcast day before an impending storm.  First up was the campground, which was surprisingly nice.  The sites are wooded with views of the lake and carpets of pine needles.  There were even campers from Massachusetts.  The Campground Trail was pleasant as it explored pine forests and some rock outcrops.

We drove to another part of the park, the more popular Frances Slocum Trail, which follows a series of cliffs and passes a large rock overhang, where it is believed Frances Slocum was held after she was kidnapped.  Mayapples were about to bloom and there were several views of the lake.  When we finished, the winds picked up and it began to rain, but three bald eagles were gliding over the lake, swirling and riding the winds.  One disappeared into a forest of tall white pine trees.

For a few more pictures, click here.

 

 

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