New York’s Best Backpacking Trails

New York has the most diverse scenery of any state east of the Rocky Mountains. The Empire State boasts vast lakes, canyons, alpine peaks, huge waterfalls, large rivers, pastoral countryside, beaches, and significant wilderness. It also has an extensive backpacking trail system. Which ones should you hike?

Most of the hikes below follow routes that include multiple named trails.  For more information, see Backpacking New York.

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Western New York and the Finger Lakes

Allegany State Park
22 mile linear hike
Easy-moderate
Hike the North Country and Finger Lakes Trails across New York’s largest state park. Enjoy scenic forests, streams, and three shelters. While this hike doesn’t have standout natural features like waterfalls or vistas, the beautiful forests and good isolation make this an ideal backpack. Perfect for autumn colors.

Letchworth Trail
23 mile linear trail
Easy-moderate
This trail stretches across stunning Letchworth State Park, exploring the more isolated eastern rim of the famous gorge. There are views of two of the giant waterfalls and great views at the southern and northern ends of the trail. The trail passes many steep ravines carved by sidestreams with seasonal cascades. There are two shelters.

Morgan Hill State Forest
14 mile loop
Easy-moderate
This loop follows sections of the North Country Trail and a rural road. It features two ponds, scenic forests, streams, an incredible vista, and impressive Tinker Falls. You will also enjoy a gorge with cascades. There’s a lot of scenery along this small loop, which is strategically located in the central part of the state, south of Syracuse. There is one shelter.

Tinker Falls

Catskills

Escarpment Trail
23 mile linear trail
Moderate-difficult
A classic trail, enjoy stunning views, ledges, rock outcrops, a lake, boreal peaks, diverse forests, Blackhead Mountain, Windham High Peak, and famous Kaaterskill Falls, which is just off trail. The trail is known for being dry. There are two shelters.

View of North Lake

Windham High Peak and Blackhead Range Loop
18 mile loop
Difficult
Summit four Catskill peaks with spruce forests and excellent views. There are beautiful spruce forests and two shelters. Water can be limited. There is a four mile roadwalk to complete the loop.

Hunter Mtn in distance

Devil’s Path
25 mile linear trail
Very difficult
One of New York’s most famous, and brutal, trails. The punishing terrain reveals incredible views, rock shelters, and outcrops. Trail is very rocky and steep in places. Enjoy the spruce forests. The eastern half is drier, has more views, and is more difficult. The western half is easier, has more water, and a waterfall. There are four shelters.

Wittenburg-Cornell-Slide Loop
16 miles (including Giant Ledge)
Difficult
The classic Catskills backpack that summits three peaks, including the highest in the Catskills, Slide Mountain. The views are stunning from spruce covered summits. Be sure to include Giant Ledge with its own series of excellent views.

Misty view from Wittenberg

Southern New York, Hudson Valley and Taconic Mountains

South Taconic Trail
16 mile linear trail (trail has been extended further south)
Moderate-difficult
The best trail that you never knew existed, put this one on your list. It features excellent vistas from grassy balds on mountain summits, cascading waterfalls, and just off trail, the stunning Bash Bish Falls. The trail straddles the New York/Massachusetts border. Alander and Brace Mtns. cannot be missed. It’s hard to believe this trail isn’t more popular.

Hikers on the exposed ridge

Harriman State Park-West
22 mile loop
Moderate
Harriman is a very popular and surprisingly beautiful park that has a vast web of trails. I like this loop because of its diversity and relative isolation. It encompasses Island Pond, Lake Tiorati, and the Appalachian Trail. There are many vistas, ponds, cascades, rock outcrops, streams, gorges, and the famous Lemon Squeezer. There are three shelters.

Island Pond

Shawangunk Ridge Trail
28 miles (entire trail is 70 miles long)
Moderate-difficult
This is the best section of the little-known Shawangunk Ridge Trail; it goes from NY 55 south to NY 171. As you’d expect for the Gunks, there are non-stop views from white cliffs. Highlights include Sam’s Point, Ice Caves, and towering Verkeerderkill Falls. The trail is very circuitous through Minnewaska State Park. Camping is a problem on this route and is prohibited along its northern half. South Gully is a scenic gorge. The southern half of this route is quite nice with many vistas, isolation, and camping potential. Watch for sun exposure on the northern half and water can be a problem in dry weather.

Adirondacks

Lake George Wild Forest
21 mile loop
Moderate-difficult
An excellent loop with beautiful ponds, cascades, and great camping. Enjoy views of pristine Lake George. The views from Sleeping Beauty, and Black Mountain in particular, are stunning. There are five shelters.

View from Black Mtn

Pharaoh Lake Wilderness
24 mile loop
Moderate-difficult
A popular and beautiful destination, this loop offers gorgeous ponds, streams, a waterfall, incredible camping, and superb views. There are also mining remnants. Views from Pharaoh Mountain are excellent. There are eleven shelters, often in beautiful locations.

West Canada Lakes Wilderness Loop
23 mile loop
Easy-moderate
A great backpack to get away from it all in an isolated wilderness. There are beautiful lakes, wetlands, and streams. Boardwalks offer views over the water. There are eight shelters, often along scenic lakes and ponds. A side hike to the top of Pillsbury Mountain from the trailhead offers excellent views.

Bridge at South Lake outlet

Cranberry Lake 50
50 mile loop
Easy-moderate
New York’s premier backpacking loop, this trail has become increasingly popular. Enjoy views of beautiful lakes and ponds, traverse the top of beaver dams in wet areas, and revel in the isolation of woodlands and grassy meadows. Do not miss High Falls or the excellent views from Cat Mtn. There are also a few waterfalls and cascades. There are four shelters and many great campsites. The trail goes through the village of Wanakena and there are almost eight miles of roadwalking to complete the loop. For shorter loops, do the High Falls or Dog Pond Loops.

Northville-Placid Trail
135 mile linear trail
Easy-difficult
New York’s premier backpacking trail, this iconic trail stretches across much of the famous Adirondack Park. This is a lower elevation trail and mountain top vistas are rare, but there are numerous ponds, lakes, rivers, creeks, and some cascades. The trail crosses grassy meadows and isolated woodlands. Enjoy the stunning scenery, rapids, and pools of the Cold River. There are many shelters and campsites, often in stunning locations. The West Canada Lakes Wilderness and Cold River sections are generally considered the most scenic, but there is no bad section of the trail. Do not miss Wanika Falls. Piseco has a post office for a food drop and showers are available at Lake Durant Campground. Hiking this trail will be an experience you will never forget.

Cedar Lakes

Cold River-Seward Range Loop
30 mile loop
Easy-moderate
An isolated loop with great wilderness, this hike offers the stunning scenery of Cold River, scenic woodlands, streams, and great camping. Latham Pond is gorgeous with its views of the Seward Range. The Cold River has incredible rapids, cascades, and giant swimming holes. There are ten shelters. Side trails lead to the summits of the Seward Range.

 

Adirondack High Peaks

The stunning scenery of the High Peaks attract hikers from around the world. It also presents a challenge to traditional backpacking due to the punishing terrain and competition for campsites and shelters. If backpacking during the busy season, it is recommended you go mid-week. These routes follow a series of individually named trails.

Algonquin Peak-Indian Pass Loop
22 mile loop
Very difficult
See gorgeous lakes surrounded by towering mountains. A side trail leads to impressive Hanging Spear Falls. The arduous climb up to Algonquin reveals cascades and stunning views from an alpine peak. Hike by Heart Lake and up Indian Pass Brook to scenic Rocky Falls. Indian Pass is insanely rugged, and beautiful. There are seven shelters near or along the trail.

Rowing on Lake Colden

Mt. Marcy-Avalanche Pass Loop
21 mile loop
Difficult
The “easiest” of the High Peak backpacks, this route has it all. There are lakes hemmed in by cliffs, scrambling, and alpine peaks. The Opalescent River is stunning with its chasms and rapids. Be sure to hike Skylight Mountain to its alpine summit. Hiking up the backside/southside of Mt. Marcy can be a little intimidating, but its is exhilarating. The top of New York’s highest mountain is stunning. Hike above Indian Falls and enjoy beautiful forests of birch and spruce. There are many shelters.

View from Mt. Marcy

High Peaks Loop
36 mile loop
Very difficult
The most difficult backpack in New York, this is an incredible and challenging loop with incredible views, waterfalls, ponds, lakes, chasms, and gorges. Take a rest at Johns Brook Lodge and tackle the Great Range with its incredible views. The views from Pyramid Peak may be the best in the High Peaks. Rainbow Falls is amazing and the classic view from Indian Head will take your breath away. The section along Nippletop and Dial Mtn. is more isolated, but still gorgeous. The section along Deer and Flume Brooks is surprisingly scenic with waterfalls and camping potential. If you finish this hike, pat yourself on the back. It is tough but so rewarding.

 

For more information, see Backpacking New York.

 

 

 

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Hike to Alpine Falls-Loyalsock State Forest

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Frozen Alpine Falls, Loyalsock State Forest

Alpine Falls is a beautiful spot in the Loyalsock State Forest, along the Loyalsock Trail. Alpine Falls is about 25 feet tall and is located in a scenic glen. There are campsites downstream from the falls, including another waterfall. Alpine Falls also makes for a great hike from Worlds End State Park and is notable for its beautiful hemlock forests. Thanks to a variety of trails, it is possible to do this hike as a dayhiking loop or as a quick overnight backpack.  The loop is about 8 miles in length.

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We began at Worlds End by hiking the orange blazed Butternut Trail as it climbed behind the cabin area along an old grade. Turn right onto the Butternut Trail loop as it enters a glen of Butternut Run with some waterfalls. Climb along switchbacks over rocky terrain and below a ledge to a nice view looking down the Loyalsock Creek into the park. The Butternut Trail continues and soon meets a yellow blazed trail leading to Loyalsock Road, on the right (if you cross the creek again, you went too far). The yellow trail climbs to the top of the plateau and then levels before reaching Loyalsock Road; turn right onto the road.

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Walk the road for about a mile until you see the Loyalsock Trail (LT); follow it to the right. The LT enters beautiful hemlock forests along a wetland and then crosses a stream. A deep gorge forms below the trail with rapids and a few campsites. The LT stays on a grade. The trail climbs under a scenic hemlock and pine forest and then descends steeply to another grade. Enter another gorge with a campsite; off trail and downstream is another falls near the state forest boundary. A short distance further a side trail is on the right and leads to the base of Alpine Falls.

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The falls drop down a series of ledges into a pool along a large cliff. It is a beautiful, isolated spot and a great place to spend the night. When we were there, the falls were frozen over and the bright sunlight made it tough to take a good picture of it.

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Now, retrace your steps on the LT back to Loyalsock Road. You can either retrace your steps back to the Butternut Trail, or hike a loop by continuing on the LT. The LT traverses hilly terrain with gorgeous hemlock forests and wet areas along an old grade. The beautiful forests have some ledges and extensive areas of ground pine. It’s a wonderful place to hike.

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Cross Loyalsock Road a final time and turn left to descend along High Rock Run. This run has many cascades and waterfalls. Pass a yellow trail to the left (which leads to the Butternut Trail) and a campsite below the LT. The LT stays on a grade above High Rock Run’s deep gorge. The trail enters hemlocks, winds in between ledges, and descends to High Rock Vista with its great view of Worlds End. Continue on the LT as it traverses as rocky area and makes a rugged, rocky descent to High Rock Run. Below is High Rock Falls, although it is hard to get a good view of it. The LT descends into the state park and the hike ends at the cabin road, where your hike on the Butternut Trail began.

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More photos.

Blue dots are waterfalls:

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Pennsylvania’s Best Backpacking Trails

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View from the West Rim Trail

Pennsylvania has the most extensive system of backpacking trails in the east, in fact, it’s trail system exceeds many western states.  These are the best of Pennsylvania’s many overnight trails.

Eastern Pennsylvania

Yellow and orange

Old Loggers Path.  This 28 mile loop has become very popular in the last few years, and for good reason.  It’s isolated, has two shelters, vistas, waterfalls, swimming holes, big rocks, and great camping.  Rock Run is a stream of exceptional beauty and Sharp Top has a beautiful view.  The OLP generally has moderate, gradual terrain.

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Loyalsock Trail.  This 60 mile route was first established in the 1950s, making it one of the older backpacking trails in the nation.  The LT is famous for its diverse and beautiful terrain with gorges, waterfalls, vistas, big rocks, isolation, pond, whitewater rapids, and swimming holes.  There are many scenic streams and campsites, not to mention hemlock forests along its eastern half.

Loyalsock-Link Loop.  A great 14 mile loop for an overnight, beginning at Worlds End State Park, or from US 220 and include the Haystack Rapids.

Pinchot Trail.  A great easier trail for beginner or younger backpackers.  The south loop has been re-routed to include Choke Creek, Choke Creek Falls, meadows, wetlands, spruce forests, and cascades-dramatically increasing the scenic beauty of that section.

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Appalachian Trail (Michaux State Forest).  Widely considered the best section of the AT in PA, enjoy historical remnants, great views, several shelters, rock outcrops, ponds, two state parks, and not to mention the Appalachian Trail Museum.

Evening mist

Appalachian Trail- Port Clinton to Wind Gap.  Yes, this section is known for its rocks.  But with rocks, comes views and this section of the AT has some excellent ones, such as the Pinnacle and Pulpit Rock.  The scrambling climb up the Lehigh Gap is a highlight as are the deep water gaps, shelters, and rock formations.  The section of the AT through the famed Lehigh Gap will be rerouted to offer more views and open ridgetop hiking.

 

Central Pennsylvania

Black Forest Trail.  One of PA’s premier trails, the famous 42 mile BFT is rugged and beautiful with stunning views of the Pine Creek Gorge, waterfalls, streams, meadows, and beautiful campsites.  This trail has some of the best views in the state.

West Rim Trail.  A popular 32 mile route on the west rim of the Pine Creek Gorge with several great views, scenic forests, small streams, and great camping.  There are also several off trail waterfalls.

Susquehannock Trail.  At 85 miles, the longest single-trail loop in the eastern US.  The STS offers deep woods immersion with isolation, streams, meadows, some views, and great camping.  There are now two shelters and one hut.  The highlight is the Hammersley Wild Area and its famous swimming hole.

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Hammersley Wild Area.  PA’s largest and most isolated roadless area, the Hammersley is a gem.  A great loop is via the Susquehannock and Twin Sisters Trail with stunning views from the Hammersley meadows. (Hint: to return to the STS, hike off trail down the ridge from the north side of the meadows, it is an exposed ridge with several great views of the canyon).  More trails are planned in the wild area.  Hammersley Fork is a stream of great beauty.

Quehanna Wild Area.  PA’s largest wild area, the Quehanna is a hiking gem with many trails that feature open meadows, spruce and pine forests, gorges, vistas, huge rocks, pond, streams, and great camping.  Jungles of rhododendron and laurel fill the gorges.  One of my favorite areas.  What trails should you hike?  Check out the Quehanna, Bridge, Bellefonte Posse, Kunes Camp, Lincoln, Crawford Vista, David Lewis, Teaberry, East Cross Connector, Sevinsky, Meeker, and Big Spring Trails.

Mosquito Creek

Allegheny Front Trail.  A 42 mile loop west of State College offers superb streamside hiking, boardwalks, views, diverse forests, and rhododendron jungles.  There are some excellent campsites.  Trails offer a cross-connector and the eastern side of the loop is generally considered the more scenic.

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Standing Stone Trail.  Nearly abandoned in the 1990s, the SST has evolved into one of PA’s finest trails.  Over 80 miles long and connecting the Mid State to the Tuscarora Trails.  It is a part of the Great Eastern Trail.  At times rocky and rugged, this trail has awesome views, old growth forests, rock formations, sinkholes, wildflowers, 1000 Steps, historical remnants, and one shelter.

Sausser's Stonepile vista

Mid State Trail-Little Juniata Water Gap to PA 45
The heart of the MST in the Seven Mountains, PA’s longest trail, features rugged ridgelines with excellent views, old growth forests, natural areas, several state parks, a tunnel, gorges, good isolation and campsites.

Mid State Trail-Woolrich to SR 2016 near Arnot
An excellent, rugged hike through the Pine Creek Gorge region that features superb vistas, waterfalls, gorges, rock formations, isolation, historical ruins, big rocks, and incredible swimming holes.

Western Pennsylvania

North Country Trail-PA 346 to Red Bridge Campground.  This trail explores the vast, beautiful Allegheny Reservoir with views over the water and great campsites.  Enjoy hemlock shaded glens, scenic streams, giant boulders, and wetlands.

North Country Trail – Guitonville Road to Highland Drive.  This section explore the stunning Cook Forest State Park and the Clarion River.  The towering old growth trees are beautiful, as is the serene Clarion River with its pristine water in a forested gorge with jungles of rhododendron.  Hikers love Maple Creek north of Cook Forest, and the waterfall on Henrys Run just south of the state park.

Morrison Trail.  An 11 mile loop with a cross connector.  Enjoy house sized boulders, streams, cascades, and views of the Allegheny Reservoir.  Be sure to include the cross connector, the most scenic part of the trail.

Minister Creek Trail.  A popular 7 mile loop is great for an overnight.  There are huge boulders, chasms, a views, streams, and great camping.

Laurel Highlands Hiking Trail.  The most popular trail in western PA, the LHHT is well known for its numerous shelters, big rocks, views, scenic forests, and streams.  Hike south to enjoy Ohiopyle at the end.

Quebec Run Wild Area.  A best kept secret, Quebec Run has a network of trails along streams filled with hemlock and rhododendron, making it feel like a jungle.  This is a diverse place, with off trail caves, and huge rocks and cliffs north of Tebolt Run, also off trail.

Oil Creek State Park  (Gerard Hiking Trail).  A 36 mile loop with cross connectors that meanders around Oil Creek State Park.  There are shelters, views, glens with waterfalls, and remnants of the oil industry, which began there.

Backpacking Pennsylvania for more trail info.

Appalachian Trail: Hike to Knife Edge and Bear Rocks

View from Knife Edge

We recently returned to the famous Appalachian Trail (AT) in PA to hike one of its more scenic, and rugged, sections.  We parked off of Route 309 and soon began hiking north on the AT, passing small campsites and thickets of laurel.  The trail was nice, but became increasingly more rocky.   There were some nice views to the south over the rolling farmlands and distant ridges.

View from Knife Edge

The trail crossed a powerline with views and a cairn.  From there, the rocks began to take over as we reached the crest of the ridge with a fine view.  Further up the cliffs was a lone vulture, looking quite large as it enjoyed the sun.

Rock hopping soon followed as we passed several other hikers.  Large outcrops were to our right.  We followed the trail as it scrambled up the rocky spine of the Knife Edge and its superb views.  I could see the Pinnacle and Pulpit Rock in the distance.  We sat and got a bite to eat in the bright sun.

Scrambling the rest of the Knife Edge was fun and we were soon back in the woods, which featured more hemlocks and another good view to the south as we hiked across the rocks.

Soon, Bear Rocks appeared to the left and I followed the blue trail to the top, which requires some scrambling.  This is one of the best rock outcrops along the AT in PA as it towers over the trees and provides several views to the east and north.  I followed the spine of the outcrop, enjoying all the views and the scrambling, finishing with a view to the west.  I dropped from the rocks and returned to the AT, retracing our steps back to the car under a setting sun.

Peeling bark on dead tree

This is an easy hike in terms of elevation gain, but challenging due to the rocks, Knife Edge, and Bear Rocks.  There are several fine views.  It is about 3.5-4 miles one way.

More photos.

Loyalsock-Link Loop

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Loyalsock Creek

 

I love the Loyalsock.  The Loyalsock State Forest is 115,000 acres of Appalachian bliss with its gorges, waterfalls, ponds, streams, vistas, whitewater, swimming holes, big rocks, numerous trails, deep woods, and superb camping.

One of the best weekend or overnight backpack loops in Pennsylvania is the Loyalsock-Link Loop.  I never get tired of this trail.  Along its 17.5 miles, it packs in so much scenery.  One of my favorite features are the forests.  This hike offers extensive hemlocks forests with moss, ground pine, mushrooms.  It is dark and mysterious with every shade of green imaginable.

I parked along Rock Run Road and began hiking the Link Trail, marked with Red Xs.  The trail followed the beautiful Loyalsock Creek with its rapids and deep, clear pools.  This loop is a great summertime hike with all of the swimming holes.  I passed two young men heading the other way and one asked about where to camp, I told them about Alpine Falls or Mary’s Bridge and we soon parted ways.

The trail climbs up to PA 154, but I like to follow a fairly well established side trail, which is the old route of the Link Trail.  It stays close to the creek and crossed the base of a cliff with springs and a wet-weather falls.  Here, the Loyalsock Creek is rugged and beautiful with its boulders.  This side route soon returns to the Link Trail.  The base of the cliffs is slippery.  Do not attempt this side route in high water or when there is ice.

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Canyon Vista, Worlds End State Park

 

The hike continued along the creek, passing more campsites and I soon reached Flat Rock, another large swimming hole.  I crossed PA 154 and made a steep climb up the plateau.  Miles of beautiful woodland hiking followed with extensive hemlocks.  The northern hardwoods smelled sweet in the moist air.  I reached Canyon Vista and explored the Rock Garden.  With lighter gear, I was making good time.  I followed the Link Trail along Double Run with its waterfalls, slides, and moss covered boulders.

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Rock Garden, Worlds End State Park

 

I then saw two older women hiking with what appeared to be overnight backpacks.  They asked if the trail headed back to the park office, I told them it did.  One lady said they bit off more they could chew and were heading back.  Regardless, they should be proud for getting out there on the trail, especially on National Trails Day.

I passed some kids fishing in the creek and one yelled hello.  I soon reached the park office and took a break to have a snack.  Two other backpackers were loading their gear in the car.

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On the Loyalsock Trail

 

I pushed on with a steep climb out of the state park.  The trail meandered among more hemlocks, ferns, and ground pine.  I reached Alpine Falls in the dark forest.  Above were some people camping.  We exchanged a hello and one asked about the rain that was supposed to come tomorrow.  I began to think about just hiking the whole loop in a day, but would see if any sites were available at Sones Pond.

I reached the top of the plateau and the woods were brighter.  The beautiful woodland walk continued with mushrooms and wildflowers dotting the forest floor.  The forests were becoming darker as I made my way under more hemlocks to Sones Pond.  The pond was beautiful in the deep twilight, offering perfect reflections as frogs croaked and an owl hooted in the distance.  However, all the campsites were taken.  I decided to finish the hike that night.

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Sones Pond at twilight

 

I returned to my car in darkness surrounded by the sound of the Loyalsock Creek.  A great day in the woods.

Photos.

Map and brochure.

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  1. The Loyalsock-Link Loop is a superb hike.  The Loyalsock is marked red and yellow, the Link with Red Xs.  The trails are well-marked and established.
  2. While I hiked clockwise, counterclockwise may be best since the climbs are more gradual, but the descents will be steeper.
  3. You can park at the park office at Worlds End State Park, or on Rock Road Road before it crosses the Loyalsock Creek located at 41.459690, -76.509617 with space for about 6 cars.
  4. On my hike, the bridge on Rock Run Road was closed to vehicles for repairs, but can be crossed on foot.
  5. Campsites are located here:  Link Trail:  Cold Run (small sites), Vinegar Run (small sites), Loyalsock Creek (larger sites).  Loyalsock Trail: High Rock Run north of Worlds End State Park, Big Run (below the trail), Alpine Falls (both above and below the falls), Tamarack Run/Mary’s Bridge, Sones Pond.
  6. The loop alone is about 17.5 miles.  The loop plus the out and back to the Haystacks is about 22 miles.  Doing the Haystacks and the loop from US 220 (a lollipop loop) is about 25 miles.
  7. Don’t plan on camping at Worlds End State Park, there are no primitive, backcountry campsites and the developed campground is about a mile from the trail.

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Gear review:

I rarely do gear reviews, but I thought I’d offer some thoughts about two pieces of gear I had.  Lighter gear helps, I found myself moving faster than I normally do with less strain on my body.

  1. REI Flash Backpack (last year’s model).  I’m gravitating towards lighter gear and I was looking for a reasonably priced lightweight pack.  The Flash is light and held the load well while offering some back ventilation.  It was comfortable, although some of the straps dug into me a little, maybe I had it too tight.  It was roomy enough for my gear and could probably be used for up to 3-4 nights for a summertime trip.  The small pouch on the shoulder strap doesn’t seem usable.  I liked the mesh netting on the outside for stuffing items.  The internal hydration sleeve is only attached at the top, so I found it easier getting my bladder back into the pack among the gear, although I may end up keeping the bladder on the outside of the pack anyways.  Overall, I recommend this pack.
  2. Nevados Compass Low.  I was looking for some trail runners, but didn’t want to pay $130 for a pair if I didn’t like them.  “Generic” brands rarely get reviewed since they don’t pay for ads in magazines.  I found them to be comfortable with excellent traction.  My feet breathed well and the trail runners dried quickly.  I did not have any hot spots during my hike.  Toe protection is good with a rubber protected toe box; my toes were comfortable.  Support was good; I didn’t roll an ankle once on the hike.  Aside from typical foot fatigue, my feet felt fine at the end of the day and surely no worse than my Merrills.  For a half to a third of the price of name-brand trail runners, this is a very good option.  I would recommend them.